NC FILM UPDATE: “5,700 production days, $254 million in spending and 25,000 job opportunities in 2013”

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Television Series Fuel Strong Year for Film Industry in North Carolina

5,700 production days, $254 million in spending and 25,000 job opportunities in 2013

DECEMBER 17, 2013 • JOBS AND THE ECONOMY

PRESS RELEASE:  Raleigh, N.C. — Popular television productions fueled one of the strongest years experienced by the film industry in North Carolina.

More than 60 productions registered with the N.C. Film Office and filmed in North Carolina in 2013. Those productions amassed a record-high of more than 5,700 production days with filming taking place in more than 30 of the state’s 100 counties.

“In addition to our state’s beauty, we’ve developed the workforce and artists that make North Carolina an ideal place to produce quality projects efficiently,” said Governor McCrory.

Year-end projections show television and film productions had a direct in-state spend in excess of $254 million and created more than 4,000 well-paying crew positions for the state’s highly skilled workforce. These productions created nearly 25,000 job opportunities (full time equivalent and temporary jobs), including talent and background extra positions, for North Carolinians. These numbers are the second highest in the industry’s history for in-state spending by productions as well as total job opportunities created.

Television series headlined production in North Carolina in 2013. Five major series—the summer’s top show “Under The Dome,” this fall’s breakout series “Sleepy Hollow,” the second season of Cinemax’s top series “Banshee,” the third season of the award winning Showtime series “Homeland” and the final season of HBO’s “Eastbound and Down”—all filmed in the state.

Production on the feature films “Tammy,” “Careful What You Wish For,” “The Ultimate Life,” “The World Made Straight,” “Grass Stains,” “The Squeeze,” “Captive” and “Tusk” also took place in North Carolina. Made-for-television movies also had a strong presence as “Christmas In Conway,” Norman Rockwell’s “Shuffleton Barbershop” and “The Perfect Summer” all were filmed and aired in 2013. National commercials for Mountain Dew, ESPN, NASCAR, Planters, Audi and Fiat also shot in the state.

“The film industry continues to have a major impact on the state’s economy and provide job opportunities for thousands of North Carolinians,” said Secretary of Commerce Sharon Decker. “It is great to see our state continue its success in the industry.”

Beyond the more than $254 million in direct spending, additional spending and job creation has taken place on numerous lower budget projects and commercials.

“The past three years have produced unheralded numbers in direct in-state spending and job opportunities,” said NC Film Office Director Aaron Syrett.

Established in 1980, the North Carolina Film Office is part of the N.C. Division of Tourism, Film and Sports Development in the N.C. Department of Commerce. Its primary responsibilities are to recruit productions to the state by marketing the many assets—including the resources, crew base, established infrastructure and locations statewide—North Carolina has to offer. In addition, the film office assists productions with permitting and other logistics and works hand-in-hand with regional film commissions in the Wilmington, Research Triangle, Piedmont Triad, Charlotte and Western regions of the state. Since its creation, 400+ projects have filmed in the state, directly spending over $1 billion and creating more than 100,000 job opportunities for crew, talent and extras.

– See more at: http://www.governor.state.nc.us/newsroom/press-releases/20131217/television-series-fuel-strong-year-film-industry-north-carolina#sthash.g18bealv.dpuf

 

BREAKING: Nicolas Sparks Flick Heads to the Crescent City

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After all the waiting and checking in with department heads, it looks like DiNovi Pictures along with Nicolas Sparks is taking “The Best of Me” to New Orleans.  No word about the possibility of any footage being shot here at all.  The Production Weekly states they begin production in March.   If anything changes, I will let you know.

Nothing has been said as to why this film is heading to the deep South, but I can think of a few reasons.  If you are thinking film incentives, let me shed some light on what Louisiana has to offer.  According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, Lousisiana  has a 30 percent transferable credit for qualified applicants for total in-state expenditures related to the production of a motion picture.  An additional 5 percent labor tax credit can be earned on the payroll of Louisiana residents who are employed by a state-certified motion picture production. The tax credits are fully transferable and the state has no limit to the amount of tax credits that can be earned by a single production.

A sad day for North Carolina indeed.

NC FILM MISNOMER: “Most of the Crew Comes From out of State”

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We’ve been trying to put misnomers to rest when we hear them. The latest comment that was made regarding crew when the article was posted about New Hanover County losing $10M IF incentives went away:

“Most of the crew comes from out of State anyway. Sad to hear it though cause if NHC loses that amount money, taxes will probably go up….AGAIN!”

Out of state? As ridiculous as that seems to you, it just goes to show you how many people are misinformed in North Carolina.   But hey, that’s what we who support the NC Film industry are here for, to educate the public, right?

I will let you answer this question.  Let’s start off with the NC Film Production Alliance who has heard similar notions.  Here’s what they say about that on their facebook page:

“Some people believe North Carolina’s film industry only supports temporary workers and movie stars.  However, the film industry is responsible for thousands of permanent jobs for North Carolinians. There are thousands of skilled workers and crew members living and working across the state, and the film industry creates a revenue source for other North Carolina industries such as tourism, construction, and hospitality.”

Folks on Facebook tackled this misnomer as well.  Elizabeth has been hearing this for almost 25 years in the business:

“They think we’re gypsies and move around to wherever the work is. Or that we’re from LA. Someone even told me that they always thought the studio on 23rd St was a photography studio! Or more likely they didn’t know about it at all. I always do my best to tell them that we’re local, own houses, pay taxes,shop, and have kids in school here. We WANT to be here, but if the work leaves, many WILL follow it to GA, SC, or wherever because our crews have experience they can’t get in those places.”

Yvonne’s been in a film family for more than two decades.  She says:

“Films, made-for-TV-movies and TV shows bring in some key people (just like the corporations who come here) and fill the majority of the crew spots with the people you go to church with, whose kids sit next to yours at school and who live right down the street from you. A strong crew base chooses to live in Wilmington because of the community. They pay taxes and spend their paychecks in local stores just like UNCW, NHHN, GE or Corning employers (the other large employers in this area).”

There ya have it.  We’ve had other questions and misnomers come in about the NC Film incentives as well as production.

Check ’em out now and if you have any other questions, please go here and ask away!

ATTENTION NC FILM SUPPORTERS: Register by Friday!

Secretary-Sharon-DeckerThe opportunity to voice your idea and concerns about the North Carolina Film Industry is coming on Monday, December 2.    The state secretary of commerce Sharon Decker will be in Wilmington to hear your stories of the impact film has had on our lives.  She wants to take those stories back with her Raleigh.  Joiingr her will be senior advisor Tony Almeida. Aaron Syrett from the NC Film Office will be in the audience. You are invited to attend the The 2013 Listening Tour session BUT YOU MUST REGISTER BY THIS FRIDAY!

It will take place 1:30-4:30 p.m. in the Windell Daniels Hall (fifth floor) at Cape Fear Community College’s Union Station, 502 N. Front St.

So who exactly is Sharon Decker?  Sharon Decker is our NC Secretary of Commerce, and has been an outspoken proponent of the NC film industry since she started in that role.  Do you remember when IM 3 did the crew shows in Wilmington? She was there that night and introduced the film and briefly spoke to the house.  

So, ALL NC  CREW, VENDORS and SUPPORTERS, come out and tell Sharon THANK YOU for her support of NC film and share why the incentive is important to you.

REGISTER NOW!  Email ListeningTours@nccommerce.com by Friday with “Southeast” in the subject line.

NC FILM: Why Does North Carolina Need Film Incentives?

whyincentivesQUESTION: So Why does North Carolina need film incentives anyway?

ANSWER:  Ya know, if you would have asked this question 10 years ago, we would have said, we don’t because it was more about North Carolina’s array of locations, crew members, and infrastructure that attracted the productions.  Now instead of producers, directors and/or location scouts coming to the area, the studios send accountants first.  Hollywood producers now instruct accountants to draw up budgets for several possible states and make decisions on the economic impact on their production, not the locations.

North Carolina for years was the third largest movie making state behind CA and NY. However in the past decade, the film industry has become a global economic driver.  We are now competing with not just other countries, but a majority of the states that have seen NC flourish and want a piece of the action.  Other governors and state legislators acted in response when they saw the jobs and the economic impact. Let’s take Georgia, for example.  In two years Georgia’s state economy will have reaped the benefits of 7 billion dollars in direct spending from the film industry, which by the way took North Carolina almost 30 years to do. So if North Carolina had no incentives, then North Carolina just couldn’t compete with the other 43 states for those jobs and economic stimulus. “Show Business” is just that, a business. Could all 44 states that are participating be wrong?

NC vs GA Film Incentives Made Simple

NCvsGAThere are a lot of people out there that don’t know the difference between states who offer “credits” and those who offer “rebates.”  No worries.  Sometimes things aren’t explained to us in the simplest of forms.  I know I need things to be explained to me like you are talking to a five year old to actually get it myself!  So, here ya go and lemme know if you understand it clearly enough!  Of course this is very general and a lot goes into both programs, but this is what it is, in its most simplest form.  Post your comments below!

Let’s say you are from California and you decided to go shopping at a lovely unique boutique called Georgia.  You are pleased with what they have and you spend $100 at the store.  The clerk says, “Hello there!  Here is a $30 in-store credit to our store for your next purchase.  You have up to five years to use it.  Thank you for shopping at our lovely boutique.”  Well, that is very nice, however, you are not planning to come back to Georgia any time soon, but you sure would love to have at least some of that $30, right?  So, you think of your friends and colleagues who might find their way to Georgia.  Perhaps maybe one of them would love to use that in-store credit.  You got really lucky and found someone that agreed to buy it from you for 85 cents on the dollar.  So now you’ve got about $25 in your pocket.

Now there is another fabulous boutique store called North Carolina.  Being from California, you are again pleased with this store, finding exactly what you are looking for and you pay the clerk $100.  The clerk says, “Thank you for spending $100 in my store.  Here is $25 back. We hope you come back soon.”  End of story.

The NC Film incentives are simple and easy.  No hoops to jump through.  That’s one HUGE reason why production companies love filming here.  So, let’s continue to fight to keep our 25% film incentives.  Visit KeepNCFilm.org

WHAT DO WE DO? NC Film Grassroots Call to Action

There is a brand new web site that has just launched their Call to Action campaign for those who wish to keep NC Film alive.  On the web site you will find every legislator for every county in North Carolina.  They are a collaboration of all walks of life who support the North Carolina Film Industry.  Crew members, vendors, local restaurant and business owners.  What will it mean to you if the film industry leaves?  Check it out, it’s a great grassroots campaign and if you love NC Film and want to end the sunset indefinitelyDO SOMETHING ABOUT IT!

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